News Roundup: Oct. 11-17

by | Oct 17, 2014

News Roundup logoEach week we round up the latest N.C. agricultural headlines from news outlets across the state and country, as well as excerpts from the stories. Click on the links to go straight to the full story.

  • “Pig farms rebound from virus; meat prices may drop,” WRAL: A virus that killed millions of baby pigs in the last year and led to higher pork prices has waned thanks to warmer weather and farmers’ efforts to sterilize their operations. And as pigs’ numbers increase, sticker shock on things like bacon should ease. Already, hog supplies are on the rise, with 5.46 million baby pigs born between June and August in Iowa, the nation’s leading producer — the highest quarterly total in 20 years and a record 10.7 surviving pigs per litter, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report. …
  • “4-H gives students hands-on science lessons,” Richmond County Daily Journal: In an effort to engage Richmond County youth outside of the classroom, Richmond County 4-H recently partnered with Richmond County Schools, local professionals and volunteers to offer 4-H Science Adventures for all the fifth-grade students in the county. 4-H Science Adventures, held from Oct. 6-9, was geared toward giving teachers and students a day of learning about science topics that are currently included in the North Carolina Essential Standards for fifth-grade science in the natural beauty of Millstone 4-H Camp. Students were given the opportunity to experience hands-on how science occurs in the world around them. …
  • “Yadkin Co. Farm Reinvents Itself After Demise of Tobacco,” Time Warner Cable News: A North Carolina farming family reinvents its business after the demise of tobacco. They’ve been working the same land in Yadkin County for over 100 years and have made the switch to one of the area’s newer crops. RagApple Lassie Vineyard was never supposed to grow grapes. “We didn’t wake up one morning and say, ‘Wouldn’t it be great to own a winery?'” said owner Lenna Hobson. “We have a winery, and you’re here before me, because you’re on a 106 year old family farm that has been in the Hobson family since way before the turn of the 20th Century.” …
  • “Sweet potatoes lead produce hit parade in N.C.,” The Produce News: North Carolina produce crops brought in $608 million last year for fruits, vegetables, nuts and berries. And sweet potatoes led the way, Kevin D. Hardison is quick to point out. Hardison is a marketing specialist with a 14-year career in the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services in Raleigh that brings a working knowledge of the 60 kinds of produce grown in the Tarheel State. “We’re ranked first in the nation for growing sweet potatoes,” Hardison noted, gesturing toward racks of publications touting North Carolina vodka, butter and chips made from sweet potatoes, microwave-ready yams and even recipes for gourmet meals with sweet potato french fries. …
  • “McCrory to France, Ireland: Leave cigarette packaging alone,” The News & Observer: Gov. Pat McCrory made headlines overseas on Wednesday after he asked the French and Irish ambassadors to the United States to stop new cigarette packaging regulations in their countries. France and Ireland are considering new restrictions that would require cigarette packaging to use uniform sizes and colors. Companies would have to replace logos with the brand’s name in a standardized font and feature anti-smoking slogans and graphic photos. …
  • “The State Fair opens and the familiar fun returns,” The News & Observer: A year already? And it seems like only days ago that the kids, wanting to flip those pennies at targets on the midway – or was it the ring toss? – took home as prizes three goldfish. Mommy and Daddy put the raised eyebrow on Pops, who had funded the prize-winning effort, because they knew they’d be getting a fish tank after they got home. And plants for the tank. And a filter. One of the fish is nearing the size of a carp, healthy still. The others … well, we don’t talk about that. The North Carolina State Fair is back, and the early weather reports, always a concern, look good. …
  • “Durham boy’s wish will come true at State Fair,” WRAL: Food and rides get a ton of attention at the North Carolina State Fair, but for many, animals are the star of the show. That’s true for Howell Brown, a Durham boy who will be granted his wish this weekend when he gets to show Miss Me, a brown and white heifer owned by Mason Blinson. Howell relocated to Durham recently to undergo medical treatment, and he’s been working with Blinson to prepare for his moment in the spotlight with Miss Me. “I grew up on a farm, and I just enjoy it,” he said of showing cows. “It’s hard, but it’s fun. It will pay off one day.” …