News Roundup: Oct. 4 -10

by | Oct 10, 2014

News Roundup logo Each week we round up the latest N.C. agricultural headlines from news outlets across the state and country, as well as excerpts from the stories. Click on the links to go straight to the full story.

  •  “Commerce Secretary Decker still hopeful Sanderson Farms will build in Cumberland,” Fayetteville Observer: State Commerce Secretary Sharon Decker said this morning she has not given up hope that Sanderson Farms will build a chicken processing plant in Cumberland County that would employ more than 1,000 people. “We are just very hopeful,” Decker said after an appearance in Dunn. “We need the jobs in Cumberland County so we’re hopeful there will be a positive resolution.” …
  • “Research station trying to cut costs for winter squash,” Salisbury Post: Workers at the Piedmont Research Station are looking to save farmers money and boost the number of locally grown squash available for fall festivals. The research station planted multiple varieties of winter squash directly after strawberry harvest, using used plastic covering for the plants and other materials. Piedmont Research Station Superintendent Joe Hampton said the study could greatly reduce costs to farmers, depending on how tests go. It’s the first year the research station has examined the idea. …
  • Up in smoke,” Robesonian: Robeson County tobacco farmers say the end of the federal tobacco buyout program won’t deter them from growing a crop that has supported their farms and families for generations — at least not for a few years. Established under the Fair and Equitable Tobacco Reform Act of 2004, the federal Tobacco Transition Payment Program ended the regulation of tobacco prices, exposing farmers to the ups and downs of the free market. The buyout program was intended to help farmers transition to an economy without price supports or quotas, and since 2004 is estimated to have paid out about $10 billion. In Robeson County, tobacco producers have consistently received about $18 million a year, although few tobacco operations have survived the deregulation of the market, negative attitudes toward cigarettes and competition from foreign markets. …
  • “NC Pumpkin Harvest Good This Year,” Time Warner Cable News: Now that fall is here and Halloween is around the corner, it’s time for pumpkin picking, and despite a harsh winter and dry July under our belt, pumpkin growers say the crops are looking good. North Carolina pumpkin growers plant a lot of different varieties from Mammoth Gold to Sugar Pie. According to the State Department of Agriculture, pumpkins can range from less than a pound to more than 1,100 pounds. …
  • “NASA drones in national airspace to spot NC wildfires,” Asheville Citizen-Times: NASA plans to fly small drones to spot fires in a wildlife refuge along the Virginia and North Carolina border next spring, marking the first time the agency has integrated drones into the National Airspace System for wildfire spotting on the East Coast, officials said Wednesday. NASA has previously used retrofitted Predator drones to map and gather data on large wildfires in the West. …
  • “Program announced for those considering a food-based startup,” Hendersonville Times-News: To help aspiring foodie entrepreneurs create a successful startup from scratch, a two-day event will be co-hosted by Blue Ridge Food Ventures and the Asheville Center for Professional studies Nov. 6 and 7. “Grandma’s great tasting recipe is no longer the sole determining factor in whether a business succeeds,” said Chris Reedy, executive director of Blue Ridge Food Ventures. The program, dubbed “The Biz behind the Food Biz: from Winning Recipe to a Winning Business,” will feature food-based business owners, as well as accountants, attorneys, grocery store executives, marketers and financing representatives. According to a release from Advantage West, a nonprofit economic development partnership that serves the westernmost counties of North Carolina, “The Biz behind the Food Biz” comes at a time when sales of specialty foods are reaching an all-time high. …
  • “Tar Heel tobacco, peach growers favor check-offs as 2014 assessments kick in,” Southeast Farm Press: The long-awaited assessment on North Carolina flue-cured finally became a reality when a grower referendum was declared favorable after a three-month balloting period. And the vote was emphatic: the assessment was approved on 88 percent of ballots in a mail-in referendum, considerably more than the two-thirds majority needed for the assessment to pass. “The margin of support for this effort indicates the level of priority our farmers place on having a strong and organized voice to advocate on important issues,” said Tobacco Growers Association of North Carolina President Tim Yarbrough of Prospect Hill, N.C. “It means the association will have the resources it needs to protect and advocate for the business of growing tobacco, and the need for that has never been greater.” Since its creation in 1982, the association has been funded by membership dues and industry contributions. …
  • “WNC ripe with agritourism,” Hendersonville Times-News: The cooling temperatures and brilliant foliage herald the coming of fall and, with it, numerous opportunities to experience the wealth of agritourism available in the region. For families, local apple orchards offer much more than just the standard pick-your-own fare. The farms offer attractions such as hay rides, train rides, pumpkin patches, corn mazes and barnyard animals, as well as delicious homemade seasonal treats such as fried apple pies, apple cider doughnuts and apple cider, and even barbecue on the weekends. For some of these farms, such as Justus Orchards, the agritourism season spanning from August to November provides their only revenue stream. …
  • “Rockin B named state’s Outstanding Conservation Family Farm,” Randolph Guide: Faced with seeming insurmountable obstacles in 2011, the Mickey and Shelly Bowman family met the challenge so successfully that last week they were named the 2014 N.C. Outstanding Conservation Farm Family. State and local officials attended ceremonies at the Rockin B Farm on Whites Chapel Road, where the Bowmans and their three sons raise cattle, chickens, hogs, goats and sheep. They’ve used a variety of conservation methods to protect the soil and water while controlling wastes responsibly. But three years ago, the owner of the chicken processing plant that the Bowmans raised birds for announced that he was closing the plant. Faced with payments for 10 chicken houses, things looked bleak for Rockin B Farm. But the family made changes, met the challenge and have thrived. …